Brant

Brant: Transport and Burial of the Dead

The Latins have come to Aeneas to request permission to properly bury their dead (100-5), who lie sprawled at the bottom of the image. Aeneas gives it willingly (106-7). He suggests making peace (108-19), and Drances agrees to bear the request back to the Latin city (122-31). In the twelve-day truce that follows, the Teucrians and Latins work together to bury the dead (132-8). Some men chop down trees to make pyres and others transport the dead in horse-drawn carts.

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 372v, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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Brant: Acoetes Accompanies the Coffin of Pallas

In the center of the image is the bier of Pallas. Here it is constructed out of wood rather than Vergil's wicker, arbutus (strawberry tree) shoots, and oak branches (64-6), though Brant alludes to these elements by having oak leaves and sprigs of arbutus. On top of Pallas's bier, to the left of the leaves is draped one of two elaborately embroidered robes which Dido gave to Aeneas, and which Aeneas now uses as a shroud for Pallas's coffin (72-7). The bier is pulled by a pair of horses. In the upper right, Aethon, Pallas's war horse (89-90) is part of the procession that accompanies Pallas back to Pallanteum, along with a wagon of spoils and an array of Tuscan, Teucrian, and Arcadian cavalry and infantry holding their spears upside down in mourning (92-4). Acoetes, who is labeled here and in Brant's version of the text as Acestes, rides in front of the cavalry, helped along by two men (85-7). The war prisoners mentioned by Vergil, sent by Aeneas as sacrifices, (81-4) are not shown, possibly for moral reasons. Aeneas watches from inside the city as the train leaves for Pallanteum (94-99).

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 371r, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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1502
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Brant: The Corpse of Pallas

Trojans and other allies of Aeneas stand outside Troy around the bier of Pallas, in mourning (34-5). The man to the farthest left of the mourners may be Acoestes, charged with the task of guarding the youth's body before it can be transported back to Evander (33-4). Pallas lies on an elaborately embroidered bier, whereas in the text, a bier is made for him out of wicker, with a canopy of branches, in lines 64-6. He is laid out in his armor, which still has a giant gash showing the point on his chest where the spear of Mezentius killed him (40-1). Aeneas, who for some reason is shown on horseback, gives a short but moving eulogy (42-58) before preparing to send Pallas back to Evander for a proper burial.

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 370v, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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Brant: Aeneas Erects a Trophy before Troy

Aeneas erects a trophy dedicating the spoils of Mezentius to Mars. He hangs the armor, helmet and weapons of Mezentius on the fresh stump of a large oak tree (5-11). In the text, he arranges the full array to look like it would on a warrior such as Mezentius, but here they are simply hung on the various branches in no particular pattern. Aeneas then makes a speech to his soldiers, encouraging them to stay strong in the coming battles (14-28). He also prepares to bury the unburied bodies of the men who died in battle on the previous day (22-5).

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 369r, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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1502
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Brant: Mezentius and Aeneas Duel on Horseback

In the top half of the image, Aeneas has injured Mezentius in the groin and Mezentius has fallen (783-95). Lausus, son of Mezentius, fearing that Aeneas will kill his father, challenges Aeneas himself (796-802). Aeneas prepares to drive his sword into the youth's abdomen (810-20). In the lower half of the image, Mezentius challenges Aeneas to a duel on horseback (873). Aeneas first weakens Mezentius with repeated spear wounds (874-87), and then throws his spear at Mezentius's horse, Rhoebus (888-94).

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 366r, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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1502
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Brant: Fight Scene with Mezentius

Mezentius rampages against the Trojans and their allies, killing many men (689-746). Three men lie dead or dying. One crawls to safety, injured. Mezentius faces off against four more adversaries, who will likely die soon. The weapons wielded by the soldiers in the image are representative of the kinds of weapons used by the soldiers fighting with and against Aeneas: swords, bows and spears. However, the particular weapons belong in the 15th century.

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 364v, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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1502
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Brant: Juno Shoves Turnus' Ship

On the right, Juno, dabbing her eyes with a handkerchief, asks Jupiter for permission to intervene in order to keep Turnus safe (611-28). In the upper right, Turnus pursues a misty form with Juno in the center of it, thinking the form is Aeneas (635-52). In the center of the image, Turnus has boarded a ship in pursuit of Aeneas (653-8). Juno unties the ropes that moor the ship to the shore (659-60), and sends Turnus out to sea (665), back home to his city, Ardea, which is shown in the top left corner (687-8). Turnus is visibly upset to be returning home like a coward (666-84).

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 362v, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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1502
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Brant: Latinus Sitting amidst Grieving Women before Laurentum

In the upper right, King Latinus sits while grieving among grieving citizens in front of the city of Laurentum. In the foreground, men move the ashes and bones from a funeral pyre into containers. In the upper left, there are troops. It appears this image was mistakenly printed here, as well as in its intended place (XI 203-242), instead of what should be an image of Aeneas's rampage (510-542).

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 360v, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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1502
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Brant: Turnus Stabs Pallas

On the shore of Troy, Turnus has started a battle against Aeneas (308-425). The battle is gruesome, as represented by the brutally beheaded figure in the foreground. In the upper middle of the image, Pallas and Lausus fight briefly without incident on either side (431-8). Juturna, Turnus's nymph sister, brings Turnus to aid Lausus (439-40). Turnus stabs Pallas in the chest with his spear (479-87). In the text, Pallas manages to wound Turnus with his spear before Turnus kills Pallas (474).

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 358v, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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1502
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Brant: Duplicate of "Two ships in a River before a City"

This image is a duplicate of "Two Ships in a River before a City", but it is used here to represent a different part of the text. In this scene, Aeneas and his new crews approach the shore near the new city of Troy and prepare to land their ships up onto the beach (287-302). Tarchon, the leader of the Etruscan troops, gives the commands, though he is not depicted in the image (290-307).

Woodcut illustration from the “Strasbourg Vergil,” edited by Sebastian Brant: Publii Virgilii Maronis Opera cum quinque vulgatis commentariis expolitissimisque figuris atque imaginibus nuper per Sebastianum Brant superadditis (Strasbourg: Johannis Grieninger, 1502), fol. 355v, executed by an anonymous engraver under the direction of Brant.

Comments

Sebastian Brant (1458-1521) was a humanist scholar of many competencies. Trained in classics and law at the University of Basel, Brant later lectured in jurisprudence there and practiced law in his native city of Strasbourg. While his satirical poem Das Narrenschiff won him considerable standing as a writer, his role in the transmission of Virgil to the Renaissance was at least as important. In 1502 he and Strasbourg printer Johannes Grüninger produced a major edition of Virgil’s works, along with Donatus’ Life and the commentaries of Servius, Landino, and Calderini, with more than two hundred woodcut illustrations. (Annabel Patterson)

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Date
1502
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University of Heidelberg
Subskrybuj Brant