© Trustees of the British Museum. Used by permission.

Replica of an Anglo-Saxon Lyre

Replica of the Sutton Hoo large lyre. Maplewood, with electrotyped fittings, bone bridge and gut strings. With tuning peg and wooden carrying case. This lyre is functional, and can be played. Replica of 1939,10-10.203.

Comments

British Museum registration number SHR.10

Associated Passages
Subjects
Medium
Dimensions
Height: 745 millimetres; Width: 210 millimetres

Fragments of an Anglo-Saxon Lyre

The remains of a six-stringed maple wood lyre were found in the excavations of the royal burial mounds at Sutton Hoo, now in the British Museum. The Museum also has a playable modern replica.  More information, with a video of a reconstructed harp being played, can be found here

Comments

Findspot: Sutton Hoo, Ship-burial Mound: 1. Excavated 1939. British Museum Registration number 1939,1010.203.65.

Associated Passages
Subjects
Type
Image
Date
7th century
Medium
Dimensions
Length: 2.3 centimetres
Location
British Museum

Claude Lorrain: Aeneas Hunting

Sketchbook drawing by Claude Lorraine: Coast scene with Aeneas hunting, illustration from Virgil's 'Aeneid', I, 158-93, translated by Annibale Caro, record of painting in the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Brussels from the Liber Veritatis; in foreground Aeneas and Achates hunting a herd of deer, beyond at left the Trojan fleet in a harbour. 1672 Pen and brown ink and grey wash, with grey-brown wash (British Museum)

Associated Passages
Type
Image
License
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
Date
1672
Dimensions
193mm x 255 mm
Inscription
Signed, inscribed and dated: "CLAVDIO/fecit/Roma/1672[formerly 1670]" and inscribed: "libro Di Virgilio/folio 10" Verso inscribed with notes
Location
London: The British Museum

Sutton Hoo Sceptre (Replica)

Comments

This object, found in the early 7th-century Sutton Hoo ship burial, is thought to be either a whetstone or a sceptre, perhaps similar to the thuuf mentioned at the end of HE 2.16. Colgrave-Mynors notes: "An object found at Sutton Hoo in the burial ship ... is supposed by some to be a royal standard of some kind ... Bede probably got the word tufa from Vegetius [Dē Re Militārī 3.5]. The Old English word thuf (tuft of feathers or foliage) with which he equated it, suggests that the standard was bushy or covered with foliage..." (p. 192, n. 3). 

See:

"Whetstone from the Sutton Hoo ship burial." British Museum. 

"Whetstone or Sceptre?" Medieval Histories (7 November 2013). Web.

Associated Passages
Subjects
Date
6th-7th c. CE
Culture
Location
British Museum
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