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Allen and Greenough/ New Latin Grammar

IMPERSONAL VERBS

207. Many verbs, from their meaning, appear only in the third person singular , the infinitive , and the gerund. These are called Impersonal Verbs, as having no personal subject.1 The passive of many intransitive verbs is used in the same way.

CONJ. IIIIIIIVPASS. CONJ. I
it is plainit is allowedit chancesit resultsit is fought
cōnstatlicetacciditēvenitpūgnātur
cōnstābatlicēbataccidēbatēveniēbatpūgnābātur
cōnstābitlicēbitaccidetēvenietpūgnābitur
cōnstititlicuit , -itum estacciditēvēnitpūgnātum est
cōnstiteratlicuerataccideratēvēneratpūgnātum erat
cōnstiteritlicueritaccideritēvēneritpūgnātum erit
cōnstetliceataccidatēveniatpūgnētur
cōnstāretlicēretaccideretēvenīretpūgnārētur
cōnstiteritlicueritaccideritēvēneritpūgnātum sit
cōnstitissetlicuissetaccidissetēvēnissetpūgnātum esset
cōnstārelicēreaccidĕreēvenīrepūgnārī
cōnstitisselicuisseaccidisseēvēnissepūgnātum esse
-stātūrum esse-itūrum esse-----tūrum essepūgnātum īrī

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Notes
1
With impersonal verbs the word it is used in English, having usually no representative in Latin, though id , hōc , illud , are often used nearly in the same way.